Journals

Science

Henss, A.-K., Sakong, S., Messer, P. K., Wiechers, J., Schuster, R., Lamb, D. C., Gross, A., Wintterlin, J.

How particles can move on a catalyst surface that, under the conditions of an industrial process, is highly covered by adsorbates and where most adsorption sites are occupied has remained an open question. We have studied the diffusion of O atoms on a fully CO-covered Ru(0001) surface by means of high-speed/variable-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy combined with density functional theory calculations. Atomically resolved trajectories show a surprisingly fast diffusion of the O atoms, almost as fast as on the clean surface. This finding can be explained by a "door-opening" mechanism in which local density fluctuations in the CO layer intermittently create diffusion pathways on which the O atoms can move with low activation energy.

Fica, S. M., Oubridge, C., Wilkinson, M. E., Newman, A. J., Nagai, K.

During exon ligation, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae spliceosome recognizes the 3'-splice site (3'SS) of precursor messenger RNA (pre-mRNA) through non–Watson-Crick pairing with the 5'SS and the branch adenosine, in a conformation stabilized by Prp18 and Prp8. Here we present the 3.3-angstrom cryo–electron microscopy structure of a human postcatalytic spliceosome just after exon ligation. The 3'SS docks at the active site through conserved RNA interactions in the absence of Prp18. Unexpectedly, the metazoan-specific FAM32A directly bridges the 5'-exon and intron 3'SS of pre-mRNA and promotes exon ligation, as shown by functional assays. CACTIN, SDE2, and NKAP—factors implicated in alternative splicing—further stabilize the catalytic conformation of the spliceosome during exon ligation. Together these four proteins act as exon ligation factors. Our study reveals how the human spliceosome has co-opted additional proteins to modulate a conserved RNA-based mechanism for 3'SS selection and to potentially fine-tune alternative splicing at the exon ligation stage.

Lab on a Chip

Lab Chip, 2019, Accepted Manuscript
DOI: 10.1039/C8LC01153B, PaperOpen Access Open Access Creative Commons Licence&nbsp This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported Licence.Nikos Fatsis-Kavalopoulos, Paul O'Callaghan, Beichen Xie, Rodrigo Hernández Vera, Olof Idevall, Johan Kreuger
The function and behaviour of any given cell in a healthy tissue, or in a tumor, is affected by interactions with its neighboring cells. It is therefore important to create...
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Nature

Davide Castelvecchi

Gravitational-wave observatory LIGO set to double its detecting power

Gravitational-wave observatory LIGO set to double its detecting power, Published online: 15 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00573-4

A planned $35-million upgrade could enable LIGO to spot one black-hole merger per day by the mid-2020s.

The vaporized rock and extreme heat at a huge landslide’s heart

The vaporized rock and extreme heat at a huge landslide’s heart, Published online: 15 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00536-9

An entire mountainside came crashing down after a devastating earthquake in China’s Sichuan Province.
Gayathri Vaidyanathan

Indian payment-for-papers proposal rattles scientists

Indian payment-for-papers proposal rattles scientists, Published online: 15 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00514-1

Researchers say the policy could intensify existing issues with research quality and misconduct.
Dalmeet Singh Chawla

Rare trial of open peer review allays common concerns

Rare trial of open peer review allays common concerns, Published online: 15 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00500-7

Study suggests that making reviewers’ reports freely readable doesn’t compromise peer-review process.
Flora Graham

Daily briefing: How one academic couple solved the two-body problem

Daily briefing: How one academic couple solved the two-body problem, Published online: 15 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00603-1

Juggling two careers and a child, how broken sleep promotes cardiovascular disease, and why we’re about to see a lot more gravitational waves.
Alison Abbott

Hungary’s scientists outraged by government budget grab

Hungary’s scientists outraged by government budget grab, Published online: 15 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00586-z

Innovation ministry’s decision to issue grant call using money meant for Hungarian Academy of Sciences’ operations sparks protests.
Quirin Schiermeier

Antarctic voyage will explore ocean hidden under ice for 100,000 years

Antarctic voyage will explore ocean hidden under ice for 100,000 years, Published online: 15 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00588-x

Scientists on board German research icebreaker Polarstern hope to observe underwater ecosystem changing in real-time.

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